Australia & Oceania

Amputee swimmer successfully swims Cook Strait

source: NZ Herald (6:41 PM Monday Oct 10, 2011)

Amputee swimmer Salvatore Cimmino is wrapped in blankets and sleeping after successfully swimming 26 kilometres across Cook Strait today.

The 47-year-old is the first amputee to swim the Strait and the first person to complete the crossing in October.

Mr Cimmino, who had his right leg amputated at the age of 15 due to cancer, said the day's efforts left him "exhausted but very, very happy''.

"We have built another bridge and are now closer to a world without barriers. This is about disability awareness and people should know disability is no barrier to great achievement, as it is no barrier to everyday life.''

He finished the swim at Perano Head at 5:05pm, after leaving the Makara coast eight hours and 18 minutes earlier.

Amputee swimmer successfully swims Cook Strait

source:www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm   6:41 PM Monday Oct 10, 2011

Amputee swimmer Salvatore Cimmino is wrapped in blankets and sleeping after successfully swimming 26 kilometres across Cook Strait today.

The 47-year-old is the first amputee to swim the Strait and the first person to complete the crossing in October.

Mr Cimmino, who had his right leg amputated at the age of 15 due to cancer, said the day's efforts left him "exhausted but very, very happy''.

"We have built another bridge and are now closer to a world without barriers. This is about disability awareness and people should know disability is no barrier to great achievement, as it is no barrier to everyday life.''

Amputee to swim Cook Strait

source:www.stuff.co.nz  by SHELLEY NAHR 06/10/2011

If it wasn't tough enough being the first amputee to attempt to swim Cook Strait, Salvatore Cimmino is making it even harder by attempting to be the first person to do so in the rough October conditions.

The 47-year-old Italian distance swimmer is preparing to take on the challenge in the coming days with the support of Kiwi sports legends John Kirwan and Philip Rush.
No swimmer has yet completed an October crossing of the Strait, with the chilly water and air increasing the risk of hypothermia.
Mr Cimmino was diagnosed with a cancerous bone tumour at the age of 15 and his right leg was amputated from mid-thigh.
He began swimming at the age of 40 for therapeutic reasons before turning it into a passion for raising awareness for disabled people. He has gone on to swim the English Channel, as well as completing swims in Israel, Italy, Mexico and Canada on his current world tour.

Equality is a right, perhaps, but no human power will convert it into a fact

source: www.salvatorecimmino.it/ By Salvatore Cimmino, 27 September 2011

It is the eve of a very challenging task, both on the level of climate and on the organizational one.

Fiji charity swim raises $20K

The original article is posted (with picture) on The Press (Stuff) since 10:16 26/08/2011

It took just under 10 hours for ocean swimmer Louise Stevenson to finish her marathon swim for Christchurch.

The champion swimmer, 30, completed a double crossing from mainland Fiji to Beachcomber Island and back in nine hours and 45 minutes. She raised $20,150 for her quake-hit home town.

Stevenson told The Fiji Times Online she was motivated by health, fitness and "doing something no one else has done yet".

Stevenson swam from the Sofitel Resort and Spa Beach to idyllic Beachcomber Island and back through the Mamanuca Islands.

Prince returns for triple crown

The original article by DAMON MEREDITH is posted (with picture) on Southern Courier since 24 Aug 11 @ 07:05pm

TO mark his 50th birthday on September 4, Michael Renford plans to swim the Catalina Channel and claim the Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming.

For all the emphasis on his age, Renford sees swimming as the most eternal of sports.

Andrew Keegan swims the English Channel

The original article is posted (with pictures) on Great Lakes Advocate since 17 Aug, 2011 04:33 PM

Andrew Keegan's first person account of why and how he crossed the English Channel.

The question of 'why' is something I often get asked and a hard one for me to answer, still don't think that I've rationalised it today.

I guess growing up swimming at the Forster Ocean Baths I always heard amazing stories of courage and endurance by great Australian swimmers like Des Renford and Susie Maroney, battling horrendous conditions to complete seemingly impossible swims when all the odds were against them.

Hurst, Gorman happy with Olympic Games course

The original article by Nicole Jeffery is posted on The Australian since August 14, 2011 8:11PM

THEY emerged from the water as thoroughly slimed as the guests at the Nikolodeon Awards, but Australian open water champions Ky Hurst and Melissa Gorman could not have been happier with the course they will compete on for medals at next year's London Olympics.

Aside from the "green slime in the togs", as Gorman described it, both are thrilled to have the rare opportunity to swim in central London for medals next year on a 10km course comprising six laps of Hyde Park's Serpentine lake.

Howard Keech Joins The North Channel Fraternity

the original article is posted on partnersite The Daily News of Open Water Swimming since Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Howard Keech became another successful North Channel swimmer earlier today after a 13 hour 25 minute struggle, the last part that was performed in 10.5°C water and with winds between 11-18 knots.

Similar to Craig Lenning last week, Howard is now one of the members of the North Channel club, one of the most exclusive and notoriously difficult fraternities in the open water swimming world to join. After his 12:38 English Channel crossing in 2009, Howard took aim at the Big One, realizing his dream today.

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