Great Britain /UK

Wild Swimming for beginners

Why go ‘wild’ swimming

There is something slightly naughty, a little bit scary and wonderfully invigorating about leaving your wetsuit at home, and entering open water with just your skin (and perhaps a swimming costume) between you and the elements.
Freed from the thermal and neoprene protection of a wetsuit, cold water immersion provides a sense of elation and relaxation, soothes muscle aches, relieves depression and boosts the immune system. It’s also a fantastically convenient way to explore the countryside, with no kit to lug around.

Tales of the Riverbank

We have tides in the river here but we are not an estuary. Here we are above where the ocean tide meets the down-flowing stream. We are quite up the river, well away from the sea in a winding route. There is no tidal bore so the tide is backed-up river water, not brackish estuarine water. The salt tide pushes upstream, then the brackish tide pushes further up until it reaches Loneswimmer Tower, where the tide is all fresh water, but where, still, it is a tide, a mesotidal reach.

CS&PF corona update

Members & Swimmers,

The CS&PF Committee has continued to monitor the constraints put in place by the UK Government, and although lockdown is easing across the UK, guidelines that set out the restrictions on the types of escort vessels operated by our pilots have been issued on 11th June by the British Government : UK Goverment Guidence Link

Wellbeing: Fancy dipping your toe into the world of open water swimming?

SWIMMING is one of the most effective ways to burn calories. In fact, just 30 minutes exercising in the water is worth 45 minutes of the same activity on land. So, with swimming pools remaining closed, but government guidelines now stating you can use outdoor facilities (while staying two metres apart), why not swap your chlorinated swim for a wild one?

Here are the places to go wild swimming in and around London this weekend

As lockdown restrictions begin to ease, is there anything better than diving, head-first, into some of London’s under-the-radar wild swimming spots?

Last year the British Medical journal actually proved that wild swimming had a positive impact on our mental health, in the same way that forest bathing gives us a much-needed dose of nature therapy, wild swimming too helps us focus on key senses and surroundings, the splish-splosh of water and sounds of chattering coots and chirpy ducklings making us happier and calmer.

Back to the open water: how to approach your return to swimming outdoors

Last week the government lifted its lockdown restrictions on outdoor activities in England, meaning that after a long break we are now allowed to return to swimming. Whether you have decided to return to the water again or not, or are still waiting for restrictions to be eased in the rest of the UK, now is a good time to give some thought about how you might approach your return to swimming.

Boris Johnson gives the go-ahead for socially distanced open water swimming in England but RLSS UK and Swim England urge caution due to safety fears

Some outdoor sports that can safely operate under the new government guidelines, including social distancing, will be able to restart from Wednesday 13 May – according to Boris Johnson in Prime Minister’s Question Time this afternoon that includes open water swimming with one other person as long as social distancing is observed at all times. This guidance applies to England only.

Real Sport

“Did you see that video on Facebook Donal? Complete tool”.
“I mean what the hell Donal, is your sport all gobshites like that?”
“It doesn’t matter you don’t use Facebook. It was on the news last night as well. Here it is here on my phone. Look!”
“What kind of a fool goes swimming in a storm? There was a marine red alert and all! I saw that on the Twittter machine.”

Alternatives to swimming: pros and cons

Does anyone remember those times before coronavirus? In that previous life, people would occasionally ask me, how do I find the motivation to do so much swimming? These were mostly non-swimmers, obviously. The question often arises from people who think you must be swimming for some greater purpose such as losing weight or getting fit. They don’t seem to understand that we swim because we love swimming. 

Lifeguarding outdoors in winter - a chat with an open water lifeguard

We chat to Francesca Ridgard, a lifeguard at London Royal Docks, to find out what it's like to lifeguard outdoors in winter.

How different is it lifeguarding in winter compared to in the summer?

The key factors of lifeguarding are prevention, recognition and rescue.

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