training & coaching

A beginner’s guide to open-water swimming – everything you need to know

Dive into the world of open-water swimming with our guide to technique, training and kit
Whether you want to complement your running with an exciting form of cross training or you’re preparing for your first triathlon, open-water swimming (OWS) is a brilliant discipline that requires a little technique, a lot of confidence and some essential pieces of kit.

Overcoming fear in the open water

A common challenge I hear from athletes about open water swimming is how to overcome fear and anxiety in the water.

I have found that having athletes focus on three key steps in preparation goes a long way to reducing stress, while increasing safety and enjoyment.

How to Help Your Swimmers Learn to Draft

Drafting is an important open water skill that can be practiced in the pool

Most of the technique coaching we provide our swimmers centers on reducing drag. Every square inch of body surface that pushes forward against the water slows that swimmer’s progress. But directly behind that body, there’s a slipstream zone that allows a following swimmer to avoid much of that resistance.

Plunging into the bay and beyond

The original article by Louisa Rogers is posted on The Journal since Aug. 18, 2011

Why would anyone choose to swim in an indoor pool with nothing to look at but painted stripes and concrete ceilings? Especially when right outside are the big, wide, inviting waters of Humboldt Bay and Stone Lagoon.

Mention “bay swimming” at a party, though, and you’ll hear, “Yuk,” “It’s way too cold,” “Are you kidding? It’s toxic!,” or “You’ll get hit by a boat.” This is a marketing problem! San Francisco Bay, with busier sea traffic and more turbulent currents, boasts a large and enthusiastic community of open-water swimmers. Yet almost no one swims in Humboldt Bay, and only a small cadre swimsregularly in Stone Lagoon.

How to Remain Calm in Open Water Swimming Chaos

Flow into the moment; don’t let the moment take control of you

Open water races can catch even experienced open water swimmers by surprise. Getting kicked, having your cap or goggles ripped off of your head, surf conditions you haven’t experienced before or haven’t experienced in some time, or accidentally inhaling a face full of water can trigger any swimmer into survival mode.

Brighton swimming teacher marks 10 years of taking people from ‘pool to pier’

A Brighton swimming teacher is celebrating 10 years of taking people from “pool to pier” with a series of events including a reunion and a beach clean.

Paul Smith, founder of the Brighton Swimming School, based at the Brighton Swimming Centre, in Eastern Road, in Kemp Town, started the Pool to Pier courses in 2009.

Balanced Front Quadrant Swimming

How do athletes swim balanced in the water?  Some might think that balanced swimming means the right arm enters the water as the left arm exits: but that would be incorrect.  Experienced freestyle swimmers have one arm entering the water as the other arm passes through the mid-phase of the stroke.  As the entering arm extends forward, the pulling arm completes the second half of the pull phase.  Then as the entering arm begins to move backward executing the pull, the other arm exits the water.  A visual example

Open water swimming is a lesson in endurance, resiliency, and gratefulness

Betsy Medalla, the masters swim coach and the country’s foremost advocate of the sport, talks about training specifically for the great outdoors—and how being grateful can calm fears and nerves.

Betsy Medalla has a curious way of describing her path into open water swimming.

“I was thrown into it, actually,” she says.

While most people would balk at the idea of being “thrown into” a sport that has the words “open water” attached to it, Medalla flourished.

Free lessons for children to learn about water safety

Booking is now open for the RNLI’s Swim Safe sessions in Tywyn, which will be taking place in the town for the first time this summer.

About Open Water Swimming, Safety and having Fun

There are several types of open water swimming:

Mass events with insurance and shared safety cover

Solo swims with dedicated safety cover

Training swims and dips without boat, kayak or lifeguard cover

Small groups swimming with shared cover - This is my subject below

Pages