training & coaching

Five Best Swimming Adventure Video Clips from Croatia

Open water offers an incredible venue for creating amazing videos of your outdoor activities. Today you can buy all kinds of video cameras to capture your adventure moments in the water and underwater. Strel Swimming company specialises in running swimming holidays in several locations across the Mediterranean and part of their trip is also a comprehensive video analysis of your technique in open water.

Oceanman attracks high portion of international athletes

Article written by Jonathan Cowie from the H2Open magazine and about Oceanman series

In a recent blog post we discussed trends in open water swimming. One of those trends was the continuing growth in ‘swim tourism‘. But swim tourism needn’t be an organised trip with boat support and meals and accommodation included; plenty of swimmers are choosing to enter races abroad and travel independently.

Maybe it is the seemingly never-ending British winter that makes an early season swim in sunnier climes so appealing. If you are prepared to travel, New Zealand and Australia offer plenty of possibilities: check out the State Ocean Swim series in New Zealand or the Cerberus Classic in Australia. Closer to home, southern Europe offers plenty of Spring swimming opportunities. The Oceanman is a series of four races in Spain and Italy, culminating in the Oceanman European Championship in Benidorm in October. But the first two races take place in April and May, giving northern Europeans the chance to get an early start to their swimming season.

Useful tips to tackle long-distance open water swims

Medium and long-distance swims are becoming truly a favourite sports challenge among the open water swimming enthusiasts thriving to accomplish their set goals and achievements by taking the plunge while experiencing the sense of freedom and excitement that comes with the awe-inspiring  natural beauty of coastal views and landscapes.

 To tackle this type of open water swims there is no need to perform at high pace. However, what comes in handy is the endurance ability enabling the swimmer to stand up for hours to a challenge which might reach 5000 strokes ( let’s say it’s the case of 6000m swim). And this stamina requires a training that goes beyond hours and hours of in-pool training sessions and accumulation of swum meters.

Drinking when thirsty is preferred

......Drinking when thirsty is preferred

Prof Rogers, who wrote a paper on the case, says endurance athletes should be encouraged to adopt a "drink to thirst" strategy, drinking when they feel thirsty rather than to set a rule.

The woman reportedly drank up to 1000ml of sports drink before the race and was on a regime of 200ml of fluid every 20 minutes during the event, alternating between sports drink and water.

It took her 8 hours and 17 minutes to complete the race and she reportedly drank another 2000ml of a combination of sports drink, tea and water after reaching the island.

"The human body evolved a long time ago to be able to maintain its fluid balance in settings where people didn't necessary have access to a lot of fluids on a regular basis," Prof Rogers says.

"If your body says you're thirsty, have a drink, and if you're body doesn't say you're thirsty, you don't need one.......

How to mentally cope with the cold in open water swimming

From the blog by Adam Walker:

If you ask any open water swimmer what is their biggest fear about swimming the English Channel at the top of the list would most probably be ‘The Cold!’ 

The fear of hypothermia and the dangers associated with it are real and should be fully respected. Many swimmers worry about how long they can endure the cold and whether they are actually capable of getting through it, and rightly so. I know when I started this wonderful sport of ours this was a big concern, with my competitive nature, I knew I would push myself through the pain and discomfort. However, it was the fear of the unknown and the situation being taken out of my control that worried me the most. One thing I would like to make clear from the outset is that I don’t take any of this for granted and know my limits – believe me I have had a few learning curves. Anyone looking to apply themselves to open water swimming should build themselves up gradually one step at a time. It is a liberating and fulfilling experience to swim in open water and when the temperature drops even by half a degree it becomes a whole new challenge to the body.

In the earlier stages of training at Dover I would hear other swimmers discussing temperature and how long they were going to swim. I would join in preempting the misery before we got into the water. This became the unintentional focus. This was due to the fear of the unknown, lack of experience and therefore self doubt of what I was capable of. After a few training sessions I decided to see a hypnotherapist who has become a very good friend of mine called Clem Turner. He taught me a number of tips of how to focus on the positives and not the negatives. He would say ‘Adam while you are thinking positively you can’t be thinking negatively and therefore while you are telling yourself you are warm you can’t be thinking you are cold.’ He would also teach me the power of visualisation, thinking about the end goal, how great it will feel when you’ve finished turning negatives into positives and in general this technique has helped me through other obstacles in life.

Cork Distance Week 2015, Ireland

Date: 
Saturday, 4 July, 2015 (All day) to Sunday, 12 July, 2015 (All day)

Cork Distance Week http://sandycoveswimmers.com/cork-distance-week

This year’s Cork Distance Week takes place for 9 days from 4th July, 2015. For more information on the camp, click here.

Schedule for the Camp
16 swim sessions as follows:

Venue change for Bute swimming conference

Organisers of the World Open Water Swimming Association’s global conference, taking place on Bute this weekend, have announced a late change of venue for the event.

The conference, which runs from Friday evening until Sunday afternoon, will now take place at the Isle of Bute Discovery Centre in Rothesay, instead of at Mount Stuart as originally planned.

How much do you need to train in your wetsuit?

Earlier this summer, southern England was blessed with unusually warm weather and a number of our gravel pit lakes hit 25 degrees Celsius, which isn’t far short of what you find in a heated indoor pool. Wearing wetsuits in water this temperature is (in my opinion) quite uncomfortable, especially when the sun is beating down. It’s possibly even dangerous. So why do so many people continue wearing their wetsuits when the water is so warm? - See more at: http://www.h2openmagazine.com/blogs/how-much-do-you-need-train-your-wets...

Earlier this summer, southern England was blessed with unusually warm weather and a number of our gravel pit lakes hit 25 degrees Celsius, which isn’t far short of what you find in a heated indoor pool. Wearing wetsuits in water this temperature is (in my opinion) quite uncomfortable, especially when the sun is beating down. It’s possibly even dangerous. So why do so many people continue wearing their wetsuits when the water is so warm? - See more at: http://www.h2openmagazine.com/blogs/how-much-do-you-need-train-your-wets...

Earlier this summer, southern England was blessed with unusually warm weather and a number of our gravel pit lakes hit 25 degrees Celsius, which isn’t far short of what you find in a heated indoor pool. Wearing wetsuits in water this temperature is (in my opinion) quite uncomfortable, especially when the sun is beating down. It’s possibly even dangerous. So why do so many people continue wearing their wetsuits when the water is so warm? - See more at: http://www.h2openmagazine.com/blogs/how-much-do-you-need-train-your-wets...
Earlier this summer, southern England was blessed with unusually warm weather and a number of our gravel pit lakes hit 25 degrees Celsius, which isn’t far short of what you find in a heated indoor pool. Wearing wetsuits in water this temperature is (in my opinion) quite uncomfortable, especially when the sun is beating down. It’s possibly even dangerous. So why do so many people continue wearing their wetsuits when the water is so warm? - See more at: http://www.h2openmagazine.com/blogs/how-much-do-you-need-train-your-wets...

Earlier this summer, southern England was blessed with unusually warm weather and a number of our gravel pit lakes hit 25 degrees Celsius, which isn’t far short of what you find in a heated indoor pool. Wearing wetsuits in water this temperature is (in my opinion) quite uncomfortable, especially when the sun is beating down. It’s possibly even dangerous. So why do so many people continue wearing their wetsuits when the water is so warm?

How do you Know when You’re Overtraining?

How do you Know when You’re Overtraining? by Lily McCann

Overtraining can lead to chronic injuries like swimmer’s shoulder, but the signs are often more subtle. If you’re over-training you might feel fatigued, experience more workout-associated discomfort than is usual, or simply feel sluggish and unfocused during workouts. Most people have off-days from time to time, but it’s important to keep note of your state of mind and body while you’re actively involved in a training session, to make sure you’re not overdoing it.

Give open water swimming a go!

According to www.swimming.org,  open water swimming has a long and colourful history dating back as far as 36BC when the Japanese organised the first open water races!  The Romans also held high-profile races in the Tiber which drew huge crowds along the banks to watch and cheer. And Knights in the middle ages reputedly had to swim in full armour as one of their seven required agilities – crazy huh?

More recently in 1986 FINA (the international governing body for swimming) officially added open water swimming to the international competition calendar and in 2008 the International Olympic Committee listed the first ever Olympic 10km marathon swimming race as one of the events for Beijing. Team GB clinched three medals in this event – half the medals on offer – and since that moment the UK has really seen an upsurge in outdoor swimming.

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